Exploring Felony Disenfranchisement through Printmaking and Stenciling

Session 1 | 12:00 PM - 1:30PM

Session 2 | 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Room 2357 | UCLA School of Law
*AT CAPACITY

 

It all started when…

The Prison Arts Collective (PAC) is based out of California State University, San Bernardino (CSUSB) and facilitates weekly programs in eight California state prisons. Our multidisciplinary arts classes are led by a collaborative team of teaching artists, university students and faculty, and peer facilitators that have participated in our Arts Facilitator Training program. All classes include the following three elements: art history/culture, reflection, and creative practice. PAC will lead an arts workshop exploring the issue of felony disenfranchisement. Participants will learn about the issue from a legal advocate and then explore the basics of printmaking or stenciling with our teaching artists. Participants in the Printmaking Workshop will create posters exploring voting rights for individuals with felony convictions. Participants in the Stenciling Workshop will create stencils posing important questions about voting. The PAC is a project of Arts in Corrections, an initiative of the California Arts Council and California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, and has also received grants from CDCR Innovative Programming and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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Annie Buckley

Annie Buckley is a multidisciplinary artist and writer with an emphasis on art and social justice. She is a Professor of Visual Studies at California State University, San Bernardino, and the Founder and Director of the Prison Arts Collective (PAC), a collaborative project that facilitates arts programming and teacher training with eight state prisons and has been awarded prestigious grants from the California Arts Council, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, and the National Endowment for the Arts. Her artwork embraces image, text, and participatory art and has been included in public and gallery exhibitions since the early 90s. She is the author of more than 200 reviews and essays on contemporary art publishing in leading publications including Artforum, Art in America, and the Huffington Post, and is a contributing editor to the Los Angeles Review of Books, for which she writes the series, “Art Inside.” She has a BA with honors from the UC Berkeley and an MFA in New Genres from Otis College of Art and Design.

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Alexander Masushige

Alexander Masushige is an artist and educator and serves as Program Coordinator of the Prison Arts Collective (PAC). His focus is on providing quality arts education to communities in need and educating individuals on expanding representation and diversity in art. He has taught watercolor at the California Institution for Men for over one year and has assisted and co-facilitated the Arts Facilitator Training in multiple prisons. Masushige works mainly in watercolor and soft sculpture. He has shown work in several exhibitions while participating in the Visual Studies program at California State University, San Bernardino (CSUSB). In December 2018, he earned his BA in Visual Studies, with an emphasis on Art Education, from CSUSB.

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Nancy Huitzil

Nancy Huitzil is a Teaching Artist with the Prison Arts Collective (PAC). She works in painting, sculpture, and photography and her interests include light, space, and sound. She has shown her work at California State University, Dominguez Hills and has collaborated with nonprofit programs including First Street Artist. As a teaching artist, Huitzil leads introductory drawing classes at California Institution for Men and California Institution for Women. Huitzil strongly believes that art is a powerful medium to express one’s thought, feelings, and experiences. She received her BA in Studio Art from California State University, Dominguez Hills in 2017.

 
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Ashley Woods

Ashley Woods is a teaching artist with Prison Arts Collective (PAC). She leads classes in photocollage at the California Institution for Men and the California Institution for Women. Woods is a California State University, San Bernardino alumna, graduating with a BA in Art Education in 2017, and an artist working in photography and painting. Her photographs have been published in magazines and news articles locally and within the Inland Empire. Woods is currently working towards obtaining her Master’s degree in Higher Education Administration.

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Damien Aguilar

Damien Aguilar is a multi-media artist and intern with the Prison Arts Collective (PAC). Growing up writing graffiti, he was arrested and taken into West Valley Juvenile Detention Center. After completing high school, he enrolled in the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising and graduated in 2011 with an AA in Graphic Design. He went on to create a clothing company––State of Mind Clothing, LLC––and began to practice the art of tattooing. In a later incarceration at Avenal State Prison, California, he was introduced to the PAC and completed the Arts Facilitator Training. One of his new works is being shown in a traveling exhibition by the PAC titled “Beyond The Blue.” With his recent release he is now interning with the PAC at CSUSB and creating a positive outlet for his art through teaching and mentorship.

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Stan Hunter

Stan Hunter is a practicing artist and a Lead Teaching Artist with the Prison Arts Collective (PAC) who enjoys working in acrylic and oil paint. Hunter is a relatively new member of the PAC staff but has been a participant in the program since its inception in 2013 while serving time at the California Institution for Men (CIM). He taught painting to peers and was instrumental in getting arts programming started at CIM and is also considered to be a co-founder of the PAC. His work has been shown in several of the PAC traveling exhibitions including “Beyond the Blue” and “Through the Wall” and was also prized by administrative and corrections staff at CIM where Stan regularly shared his art. Stan finds purpose in sharing his skills and artistic techniques with those who may be struggling to find their own purpose.